Blog tour: ‘Trailblazer: Lily Parr the Unstoppable Star of Women’s Football,’ by Elizabeth Dale, illustrated by Carolina Coroa.

Nowadays, women’s football is shown on the television and some of its star players are household names.  It seems difficult to believe that in 1921, the Football Association decided to ban women’s football. But who was playing? And why had some women been allowed to play in the first place? ‘Trailblazer’ may just give you … Continue reading Blog tour: ‘Trailblazer: Lily Parr the Unstoppable Star of Women’s Football,’ by Elizabeth Dale, illustrated by Carolina Coroa.

#TuesdayReviewsDay: ‘When I Coloured in the World,’ by Ahmadreza Ahmadi, illustrated by Ahsan Abdollahi, translated by Azita Rassi.

As regular readers of this blog and my Twitter feed might know, I am a huge fan of the beautiful and diverse picture books published by Tiny Owl Books. That’s why I was so pleased that they’ve launched YouTube channel to share their stories with a wider audience, and honoured to be asked to record … Continue reading #TuesdayReviewsDay: ‘When I Coloured in the World,’ by Ahmadreza Ahmadi, illustrated by Ahsan Abdollahi, translated by Azita Rassi.

‘How to be Extraordinary,’ by Rashmi Sirdeshpande, illustrated by Annabel Tempest.

I love that the whole premise of this book is to inspire readers to think about how they are extraordinary too. Inside, is a fabulous selection of inspirational figures from around the world - some well-known and some less so. This wonderful book is so packed full of some of the most amazing people, that … Continue reading ‘How to be Extraordinary,’ by Rashmi Sirdeshpande, illustrated by Annabel Tempest.

‘Felix After the Rain,’ by Dunja Jogan, translated by Olivia Hellewell.

Today marks the start of children’s mental health week. It’s a sad fact that children’s mental health services are receiving many more referrals than they can process so vulnerable children are having to wait months and even years before they are able to talk to a specialist. It’s for this reason that books like ‘Felix’ … Continue reading ‘Felix After the Rain,’ by Dunja Jogan, translated by Olivia Hellewell.

‘Under the Great Plum Tree,’ by Sufiya Ahmed, illustrated by Reza Dalvand.

You know when you receive a package in the post from Tiny Owl that it’s going to contain a beautifully produced title of diverse heritage. ‘Under the Great Plum Tree’ comes from Panchatantra, which is an ancient collection of Indian animal fables. Various versions of the same story can be found around the world (making … Continue reading ‘Under the Great Plum Tree,’ by Sufiya Ahmed, illustrated by Reza Dalvand.

Make a Song and Dance about it – books which celebrate the arts.

With time for music and dance being squeezed out of the primary school timetable, it seems important that we use every means necessary to encourage and inspire a love of music and dancing in children. This varied selection of picture is sure to cause music-making and merriment amongst their readers. ‘Jazz Dog’ by Marie Voigt … Continue reading Make a Song and Dance about it – books which celebrate the arts.

‘Shadow,’ by Lucy Christopher, illustrated by Anastasia Suvorova.

Today’s my stop on the blog tour for ‘Shadow,’ Lucy’s first picture book. As well as a special about about the inspiration behind writing the story, I’ve also recorded a podcast interview with Lucy, talking in more detail about the themes and processes behind creating the book.  Listen HERE. The girl and her Ma have … Continue reading ‘Shadow,’ by Lucy Christopher, illustrated by Anastasia Suvorova.

‘The House Of Madame M,’ by Clotilde Perrin, translated by Daniel Hann.

If you’re looking for for something a little bit different this Halloween, I would strongly suggest that you purchase yourself a copy of the gloriously gothic ‘The House Of Madame M.’ Are you brave enough to enter the house of the mysterious Madame M? It’s full of creepy monsters, cobwebbed hiding places and sights to … Continue reading ‘The House Of Madame M,’ by Clotilde Perrin, translated by Daniel Hann.

Introducing classic texts in a primary school (part 2): ‘Treasure Island’ as seen at the Oxford Reading Spree.

I recently had a great time at the Oxford Reading Spree, hosted by Ed Finch at Larkrise Primary School.  I had been invited to run a workshop about how and why to introduce ‘classic’ children’s literature in a primary school, based on my own experiences. I chose to share some of the texts and activities … Continue reading Introducing classic texts in a primary school (part 2): ‘Treasure Island’ as seen at the Oxford Reading Spree.

Introducing classic texts across the primary school: Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland (as seen at Reading Rocks South)

The National Curriculum states that children should be exposed to a wide range of texts, including those from our own cultural heritage. So what exactly does that mean? You may have heard these books referred to as ‘heritage texts’ or ‘classics.’ Either way, we aren’t lucky to have a wealth of classic children’s books to … Continue reading Introducing classic texts across the primary school: Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland (as seen at Reading Rocks South)

‘Flat Stanley’ – the picture book edition by Jeff Brown, illustrated by Rob Biddulph.

Flat Stanley is the classic tale of a boy who’s as flat as a pancake and now it’s available in a new picture book version for younger fans to enjoy! When Arthur Lambchop alerts his parents to an accident which has occurred in the bedroom he shares with his brother Stanley, they seem more concerned … Continue reading ‘Flat Stanley’ – the picture book edition by Jeff Brown, illustrated by Rob Biddulph.

‘The Language of the Universe,’ by Colin Stuart, illustrated by Ximo Abadía.

In my experience, engaging and digestible books about mathematics aren’t far and few between. Enter ‘The Language of the Universe: A Visual Exploration of Mathematics.’ This large-scale hardback tome is packed with information about how maths permeates everything in our universe. From atoms to Fibonacci, planets to cryptology. Maths underpins every one! Organised into four … Continue reading ‘The Language of the Universe,’ by Colin Stuart, illustrated by Ximo Abadía.